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Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Tue May 12, 2015 7:07 pm
by Richard A. White

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Tue May 12, 2015 7:18 pm
by legendre
I've also use super glue, which is cheap and available. Plus, if you get it in the multi-pack of little tubes, you've always got a fresh tube when you need it.

As to how it holds up over many years, I don't have any data - but I sure don't see it breaking down in 10% ethanol.

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Tue May 12, 2015 7:51 pm
by Archangel
Thanks, Richard

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Tue May 12, 2015 9:13 pm
by JoeCB
I don't know about the cure time on the dope experiment, but I'll try and find out. As for a complete cleaning and de-greasing of the old cork, that's VERY good advice. Don't forget that that old fuel was loaded with oil.

Joe B

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Tue May 12, 2015 10:35 pm
by kevinf
I went hunting Red Kote a couple of years ago in the Ottawa area and found a motorcycle shop that used it. They didn't stock it for resale but were willing to order it. I ended up replacing the tank as it was cheaper :-)

Like most others I ve had good luck with the standard clear dope on floats. It's designed to resist glo fuel which is methanol based so it's tough.

Kev

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Tue May 12, 2015 10:38 pm
by Mr. Asa
Bob Prock wrote:Joe, any idea how long the paint had to cure before it was soaked in fuel? That might make a difference. I've noticed "fuel-resistant" paint needs at least a week to cure. That being said, when I use Crazy glue, I've only let it set up for a few minutes with no apparent problems (yet). One thing I have noticed though, when you go to re-coat an old cork float, make sure it's completely clean of any old fuel. I use Gumout carb cleaner or lacquer thinner and then let the cork dry out completely before attempting to recoat.

Crazy glue dissolves in acetone, been a long while since I have looked some of this up, but from what I remember similar solvents can be found in gasoline today. Have you done any testing with it, or just examined the floats upon rebuilding the carbs?

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Tue May 12, 2015 11:13 pm
by legendre
Mr. Asa wrote:Crazy glue dissolves in acetone (...)


From Wikipedia:

"Acetone, commonly found in nail polish remover, is a widely available solvent capable of softening cured cyanoacrylate. Other solvents include nitromethane, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methylene chloride. Gamma-Butyrolactone may also be used to remove cured cyanoacrylate. Commercial debonders are also available."

This surprises me. Isn't acetone also used in the 'accelerators' for cyanoacrylate?

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Wed May 13, 2015 9:25 am
by Tubs
I was using Kreem for awhile and it seemed to work OK.
The motor this carb went on was left on the boat and used
several times a day for just over 4 weeks with out any issues.
I don't coat them anymore after a knowable member explained
to me that the coating is meant to keep fungus from growing
on the cork not to keep it from absorbing fuel. To learn if that
is true I quit coating them. So far I haven't had any issues and
possibly the alcohol keeps the fungus from growing. Still an
experiment for me. Use your best judgment.

Image

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Wed May 13, 2015 10:11 am
by Jerry
Red Kote is available on eBay most of the time for a reasonable price. I use it for the 2-piece Martin "40 and 45" tanks instead of trying to replace that nasty gasket.Coat the inside, slosh it around...done!
When using Red Kote...avoid opening the lid on the can. That will hasten the stuff inside drying up....instead, poke a small hole in the can and pour it out thru the hole then tape up the hole...it will last longer.

Re: Best cork carb float coating

Posted: Wed May 13, 2015 10:46 am
by Phil B
Jerry wrote:Red Kote is available on eBay most of the time for a reasonable price. I use it for the 2-piece Martin "40 and 45" tanks instead of trying to replace that nasty gasket.Coat the inside, slosh it around...done!


Any prep of the insides first?