oil

Outboard Related Only
chuck86
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 6:38 pm

oil

Postby chuck86 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:25 am

what oil and weight do you recommend for my 1920 motors
would like to use one oil
is 8 oz per gal ok?

User avatar
Chinewalker
Posts: 550
Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:21 am
Location: 1000 Islands

Re: oil

Postby Chinewalker » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:40 am

Use the modern TCW3 rated oil of your choice/preference. Any modern oil with that rating will be much, much better for the motor than anything available way back when.

Most folks I know running 1920s iron use 8:1 ratio, or in that ballpark. It's what I run in my '28 Quad and Speedsters.

outbdnut2
Posts: 797
Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2016 2:46 pm

Re: oil

Postby outbdnut2 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:48 am

chuck86 wrote: is 8 oz per gal ok?



Use 16 oz/gallon, That is 8 to 1. Amazing how they hardly smoke at all when they get warmed up and running on this much oil.
Dave

User avatar
Mumbles
CYBER SHERIFF
Posts: 3719
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 3:42 pm
Location: Victoria BC

Re: oil

Postby Mumbles » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:57 am

For Johnson owners:
Attachments
Old Johnson Oil Ratios.JPG
Old Johnson Oil Ratios.JPG (82.55 KiB) Viewed 547 times
Still searching for a rudder and hardware to fit a KOBAN. ☺

Member of the http://uppercanadachapteroftheaomci.yolasite.com/

User avatar
twostroke
Posts: 151
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2017 12:34 pm
Location: Central Lower MI

Re: oil

Postby twostroke » Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:06 pm

Saved and printed. Thanks!

Jim
I say "Pardon Me" a lot. I had a 20H with a toilet bowl, then raced open mod sleds. :D

User avatar
Garry in Tampa
Posts: 2570
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 2:32 pm
Location: Florida

Re: oil

Postby Garry in Tampa » Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:31 pm

The problem with some antiques is that the production specs of that era were of greater latitude than the precision machines of today produce.. No seals were used and many depended or grease or heavy oil to seal the crank case. (Many Row Boat Motors have grease cups on the crankshaft bearings) Todays oils are fantastic as far as eliminating ware but some antiques may require a shot of heavy weight oil to properly seal the motor. Unfortunately this promotes carbon formation, requiring periodic service to remove. If ignored, carbon flaking off the combustion chamber con score cylinder walls. At none time this was thought to be caused by a lack of lubrication which made them recommend more oil . . . :lol:

Image
Last edited by Garry in Tampa on Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Living my dream because Reality is too expensive . . .

chuck86
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 6:38 pm

Re: oil

Postby chuck86 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:39 pm

Garry in Tampa wrote:The problem with some antiques is that the production specs of that era were greater latitude than the precision machines of today produce.. No seals were used and many depended or grease or heavy oil to seal the crank case. (Many Row Boat Motors have grease cups on the crankshaft bearings) Todays oils are fantastic as far as eliminating ware but some antiques may require a shot of heavy weight oil to properly seal the motor. Unfortunately this promotes carbon formation, requiring periodic service to remove. If ignored, carbon flaking off the combustion chamber con score cylinder walls. At none time this was thought to be caused by a lack of lubrication which made them recommend more oil . . . :lol:

Image

chuck86
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2017 6:38 pm

Re: oil

Postby chuck86 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:54 pm

Garry in Tampa wrote:The problem with some antiques is that the production specs of that era were greater latitude than the precision machines of today produce.. No seals were used and many depended or grease or heavy oil to seal the crank case. (Many Row Boat Motors have grease cups on the crankshaft bearings) Todays oils are fantastic as far as eliminating ware but some antiques may require a shot of heavy weight oil to properly seal the motor. Unfortunately this promotes carbon formation, requiring periodic service to remove. If ignored, carbon flaking off the combustion chamber con score cylinder walls. At none time this was thought to be caused by a lack of lubrication which made them recommend more oil . . . :lol:

[img]http
s://www.walagata.com/w/chapsboy/0-Signature.jpg[/img]


My understanding is TC-W3 is oil that has passed certain standards. I have thought of using Tohatsu 2 stroke outboard oil.
Can I add one or two ounces of 40 wgt non detergent oil or will this give me problems .. Otherwise can just use 40wgt non detergent. Only plan on running this a 3 or 4 times this summer. Same applies to my other 4 1920 motors.

Thanks for your Input

chuck86 So far 154in of snow - more on the way.

User avatar
Garry in Tampa
Posts: 2570
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2015 2:32 pm
Location: Florida

Re: oil

Postby Garry in Tampa » Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:27 pm

Adding a little SAE 40 wt non-detergent helps. That is what I do on my well used antiques. Steve Woods does not, but his antiques are rebuilt to very exacting specifications. . . ;)

Image
Living my dream because Reality is too expensive . . .

Chris_P
Posts: 2468
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2015 4:59 pm
Location: Hamilton ON
Contact:

Re: oil

Postby Chris_P » Tue Feb 13, 2018 7:26 pm

Be aware of WHICH motor you are running as well. Racing motors for one obviously require more oil than trolling motors do.


Return to “Ask A Member”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: 20mercman, dmbono, John8504, Tubs and 7 guests