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  • frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199453

    The baffle was an attempt to keep the harsh environment of hot water and exhaust away from the lower seal area. It didn’t do too good a job of it, but better than nothing, I suppose. At some time in history, the mid-section exhaust housing was changed, making the baffle unnecessary, That is why no baffle in your ’69. Since you are using the old ’60 exhaust housing, I suggest continuing to use the baffle.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199411

    Gut reaction is something is seized in the lower unit, below the clutch or lower. Or bird’s nest of fish line behind prop???

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199374

    Nothing to fear, except fear itself. It isn’t as hard as it looks. It will help if you have a hand impact screwdriver to get all those shroud screws out.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199220

    One more question. This motor is going to need the usual stuff (coils, impeller, etc ) Where would you recommend getting parts for these motors from?

    That’s a good question, that I don’t have an answer for. Brian Wilcox MIGHT be able to make a new impeller, using the old hub.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199186

    First things first. How’s the coil? If it’s mushy/leaking, you got a problem. Pretty rare. Having said that, the magneto is pretty similar to Mercury motors of the era. Lotsa Merc guys lurk here.

    7.-Magneto

    Attachments:
    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199178

    Lastly—

    PG010018

    PG010019

    PG010020

    PG010021

    • This reply was modified 3 days, 21 hours ago by frankrfrankr.
    • This reply was modified 3 days, 21 hours ago by frankrfrankr.
    Attachments:
    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199172

    More

    PG010014

    PG010015

    PG010016

    PG010017

    Attachments:
    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199165

    And more–

    PG010010

    PG010011

    PG010012

    PG010013

    • This reply was modified 3 days, 21 hours ago by frankrfrankr.
    • This reply was modified 3 days, 21 hours ago by frankrfrankr.
    Attachments:
    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199159

    More—

    PG010006

    PG010007

    PG010008

    PG010009

    Attachments:
    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199153

    Here’s the book for your model.

    PG010001

    PG010002

    PG010003

    PG010005

    Attachments:
    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199078

    The tall sleeve on the left is a piston ring compressor. Best kind ever made. Only thing is, it only fits one size.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #199063

    After doing who knows how many thousands of them, it gets easy.

    1. Before you begin, look at the pulley. See that little hole, about 1/8″ dia? Find a nail or allen wrench or whatever you have that will fit through the hole and set aside for later

    2. Remove rubber handle then grab hold of the knot at the other end of the rope and pull it out of the pulley.

    3. Place the outer spring eye over the pin. Now wind the spring in as if coiling up a garden hose.

    4.. Check the inner end of the spring. Is it located handy so you can lower the pulley’s pin into it? If not feel free to adjust it. The end of the spring will stand a reasonable amount of bending.

    5. Lower the pulley into the housing, aiming for the spring end loop. The rest is easy.

    6. Lubricate the spindle with some light grease and slip it into the pulley. then the screw, washers, etc

    7. Hold it down to the bench top and rotate the pulley to wind the spring as far as it will go, then back it off a full turn. Then stick that nail into the small hole. That will keep the pulley from re-winding. WARNING!! Be sure you don’t let it get away from you while winding. If it does it will violently unwind, backlash, and destroy the spring.

    8. Now, feed the rope into it’s hole in the pulley and out of the recoil housing. Make sure it goes behind the pin beside the hole.

    9. Reinstall the handle, hang onto it, remove the nail and let it rewind slowly

    10. Lubricate the spring through the holes in the pulley.

    11. Done. I could have done the whole job in less time than it took to type all this.

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 3 hours ago by frankrfrankr.
    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #198863

    You said it yourself–“military model”. That explains it. I suppose there are a few of them around, but the only ones I’ve ever seen are here on aomci.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #198848

    That’ll work

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #198815

    Can’t say I remember the fill plug arrangement on the Clinton, but the usual procedure is to squeeze it into the fill plug till it comes out the vent plug. So, that’s full or nearly so. Some air space for expansion is ok.

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