1954 15 hp Evinrude starter

Home Forum Ask A Member 1954 15 hp Evinrude starter

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • mercuryman
    mercuryman

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 385
    Topics: 146
    #195030

    My evinrude is very hard to pull over with starter but easy with rope around flywheel. Compession 90 psi & 81 psi. Is it the starter or me I am 83. The starter pulls easy when removed from motor.

    David Bartlett
    David Bartlett

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 290
    Topics: 16
    #195043

    That is old style starter. Has less mechanical advantage than later type.

    I have a ‘53’ version. Great running but hard to pull over when cold.

    David Bartlett
    Pine Tree Boating Club Chapter

    "I don't fully understand everything I know!"

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #195044

    It’s you. I’m 83 also and know what you mean. My little 3hp’s get harder to pull every day. And harder to lift too.

    Yes, those early Simplex starters had small pulleys and were harder to pull. Could be extremely hard if it has the wrong spring installed There were two springs at the time, one was for the Big Twins and was much stronger. Due to supersedings over the years, I don’t know how the new ones compare, or what’s in yours.

    Avatar
    garry-in-michigan

    Lifetime Member
    Replies: 3544
    Topics: 31
    #195050


    In cases where the starter rope has come loose from the handle or broken, the rope sheave will rewind so fast that the spring will fold back on itself. The spring should then be replaced. If an attempt is made to straighten the spring The kinks will cause friction and require greater tension to rewind. Also the lithium bases (white) grease used to reduce friction stiffens with age. Note the starter uses a friction spring 302222 to extend the starter pawls. This spring MUST be seated an the indicated step on the starter spindle.

    The original starter rope and anchor had a bronze cable at it’s core. If exposed, thin can cut into the aluminum housing. A nylon woven rope is now used. Be SURE there are NO rough edges in the housing that will damage the nylon. Heat is used to fuze the end of the nylon rope to keep it from fraying and stiffen it to keep the knot from slipping.

    The starter spring used is number 18-6501

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4833
    Topics: 48
    #195053

    Back in “the Day”, the small Simplex starters used 41-197 (307573) spring, while the Big Twins used a 375836 spring (stronger). Note that the Sierra chart above lists their number 18-6501 as a fit’s-all spring.

    Avatar
    garry-in-michigan

    Lifetime Member
    Replies: 3544
    Topics: 31
    #195055

    The 18 horse starter has an elliptical rope sheave and requires less effort. It needs a different flywheel and I don’t know if any parts are interchangeable . . .

    mercuryman
    mercuryman

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 385
    Topics: 146
    #195088

    Well I think I will sell it to a 30 year old, thanks

    Tubs
    Tubs

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2803
    Topics: 161
    #195137

    mercuryman
    mercuryman

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 385
    Topics: 146
    #195157

    I had to remove one plug to start it, after I ran it a while it would start on 2 plugs. I ran the motor 1/2 speed about 10 minuets and it got a little easier but still hard to pull. I tried my 1956 Johnson 15 hp and it was a lot easier it has the 18 hp type starter.

    Avatar
    jeff-register

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 1159
    Topics: 48
    #195158

    That’s now true history when Frank & Garry reply. Reminds me of a few programs ago with the club. I too find things heavy now. ;>)

    Avatar
    johnyrude200

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 776
    Topics: 183
    #195235

    May I give you all a piece of advice as a former
    physiologist and professional coach. Instead of fussing with any of these motors smaller than a BIGTWIN. Take an electric battery drill gun you can find at any hardware big box chain, buy the 20V version such as RYOBI (about $80 bucks), switch it to the high torque mode (they have a speed and torque setting), spend $2 at walmart to buy a hex bit, and use the drill gun on the flywheel nut as an electric starter. Let me say the older BLUE model RYOBI drill guns are substantiallu better than the current GREEN ones. Ebay sells them cheaply; the batteries are what cost money.

    I started doing this 5 years ago on any motor where the drill gun will handle the stress. This works in general on any OMC 22 c.i. or smaller from my experience.

    I processed 35 motors over a 2-day period last week and only pulled over 3 by rope because they had powerheads bigger than 22 c.i. My shoulder still feels fine 🙂

    Make sure you put your free hand on the base of the drill gun to minimize the kickback initially when you pull the trigger otherwise you might hurt your wrist. The high torque mode of battery drill guns will twist it right out of your grip overboard depending on how strong your grip is, or possibly hurt your wrist.

    I do recommend trying this slowly – pull the trigger slowly – until you understand what I am talking about. Once you do, you wont go back to trying start any of the old motors without a drill gun. Even rowboat motors or any of the old iron with exposed flywheel nuts – just use a battery powered drill gun where applicable. Of course in a test barrel/tank where you have access to an outlet, just use your favorite electric drill gun for more power. Same philosophy applies to fogging motors too. If it’s a small motor use the high speed low torque setting and you dont have to worry about injury in general.

    The nice thing about this is your cranking speed is generally going to be faster and constantso with magnetos you should know right away if your ignition is correct or wrong, and if you are doing an initial carburetor calibration you can play with your needle settings after a pop or fart until it is running on it’s own without having to pull and pull and pull in frustration. Most the time a manual starter is going to give about 3 turns of the flywheel on a pull. So on a cold motor the first pull or two just gets a fuel charge into the cylinder(s), the 3rd pull igniting the charge. If it doesnt happen with a drill gun after 2 seconds YOU AINT STARTING IT BY HAND.

    I mean – when the settings, ignition, and fuel systems are set up right all of these motors should start on 3 pulls cold.

    mercuryman
    mercuryman

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 385
    Topics: 146
    #195300

    When the engine starts will it yank the drill ?

    Avatar
    johnyrude200

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 776
    Topics: 183
    #195301

    You can just pull the drill away. No big deal. Ive had rhe hex bit stay on once in awhile but you just shut the engine down and remove then restart the motor easily by hand or the drill again. Usually once its running already, one turn of the flywheel should get it restarted anyway.

    Avatar
    JOHN HOLBIK

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 30
    Topics: 2
    #195439

    I have used the drill method for years first was on a LawnBoy mower with a broken rewind and on various smaller outboards.I sawed offa 3\8s extension and use a socket. I had a couple of flywheel nuts come loose on the LawnBoy and a Sportwin N.I still use this method but I check the nuts.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.