1969 Johnson 40ESL69R Charging/Shifting question

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  • todd281
    todd281

    US Member - 1 Year
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    #178982

    I have a good running 40ESL69R Evinrude Electric shift with a complete charging system that works fine. As I understand these systems, if your battery ran low enough, you would be unable to engage the drive . So it could happen that you could pull start the motor , but still be left stranded . My question is IF that were to happen, and your motor had the charging system would it be enough to run the gearcase?

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    amuller

    US Member - 2 Years
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    #178989

    If I understand your question, the generators on those motors are only rated at about ten amps, but that is more than the gearbox solenoids need–maybe 1-2 amps. So yes, if the generator is working you should be able to engage forward or reverse gear.

    But if the generator is working and the motor is running the battery should not go dead. Is the scenario you are considering a run-down battery due to use of lights and electronics?

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
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    #178995

    10 Amps is not the issue. The issue is it doesn’t put out ANY amps until it is running at somewhere around 2000 RPM. So, I suppose it might be possible to rev it up and slam it into gear. On the other hand, if the battery isn’t completely dead, it should put out enough to shift, even if not enough to run the starter. In any case, time to head for home.

    todd281
    todd281

    US Member - 1 Year
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    Topics: 25
    #179002

    I am think worst case here.. I would be very frustrated to have a running motor but still be left stranded in one of the finger lakes because the battery had lost enough charge[ whatever the cause] and the thought crossed my mine that perhaps this was a safe-guard against such a thing . It not that I would want to keep using the boat that way, just get back to the docking/entry point without having to rely on a tow. Looks like, if I am understanding this right , it would work out in a emergency.

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    amuller

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 892
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    #179013

    It’s my understanding that all the big twins with electric shift came with generators, which were optional on the manual shift models.

    One thought would be to bring along a garden tractor battery and some short, light, jumper cables.

    todd281
    todd281

    US Member - 1 Year
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    #179018

    The scenario is this ;
    1-my battery is stone dead ,
    2-I can pull start the outboard to get it running
    3-the charging system is not faulty
    now with the motor turning at the higher RPMS , will the generator charge? or does there need to be some residual charge left in the battery to excite and or operate the generator/ regulator system?

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4584
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    #179020

    You show some knowledge there. The generator retains some magnetism in the fields (polarization) to begin producing electricity as soon as it is spinning fast enough. No additional polarization is needed unless it has been sitting forever or has been messed with. DO NOT attempt to polarize the regulator on this system.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
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    #179021

    If the battery is stone cold dead, it would take the generator running all day long to charge it up again. But it can do it if you have the time and gas.

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    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2810
    Topics: 36
    #179037

    The problem here is that you have to rev up the engine before the generator kicks in, but you should only shift the engine at idle…And, if it did go into gear, you would not want to rev it up much because it might jump out of gear due to higher load on the system and extremely weak battery….Jumping out of gear at a higher RPM usually will cause internal damage to the electric shift gearcase….
    So, I am thinking that a small spare battery would be the best solution to this scenario…But, you wouldn’t want to use regular jumper cables between the batteries, I would probably just connect the smaller battery to the engine and rope start it….Charge the normal battery properly when you get back home.
    These engines usually have an ammeter, but that is not a great indicator of battery condition, just says the generator is putting out….You might consider adding a voltmeter in the dash (or perhaps underneath if you don’t want to mess up the boat’s dash board}.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
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    Topics: 43
    #179043

    Just wondering, is this a hypothetical question? How come the battery is stone cold dead anyway/ Something left turned on overnight or what? If that is the case, you should have never left the dock anyway.

    todd281
    todd281

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 60
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    #179057

    the problem came to me this way, The system has the “solid state” type of regulator to replace the “Prestolite” older contact switching type regulator that seems can be only had from the a contact at the Smithsonian . So with that in line , when the Key is in the “on/run” position the generator is charged. It , [being basically a DC motor] is trying to turn against the flywheel rotation of the outboard. Thus using the charge in the battery. I had the engine stall at low RPMs and went to investigate what the cause was, forgetting to turn off the key. Normally “key on” with a magneto motor would only run accessories this boat has a master switch so no accessories were “on”However the draw to the generator. and time spent, was great enough to discharge the battery enough that I needed run the small kicker to get back in. Now I am wondering if there is a better solution . perhaps with that Prestolite type Regulator this would not happen? I am thinking with that, when the outboard is not turning the contacts inside the regulator, would perhaps be open therefore disconnecting the generator from the system? Hmmmm

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
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    #179063

    Oh wow—I gotta ponder on this one. I’m busy cooking dinner now. Later.

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4584
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    #179065

    While the pot is simmering, I’ll say this: Yes the Prestolite regulator has a relay that disconnects the generator from the battery when output is below 14 V (or whatever the spec is)

    frankr
    frankr

    US Member - 1 Year
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    #179067

    There are some NOS Prestolite regulators on e-bay.

    todd281
    todd281

    US Member - 1 Year
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    Topics: 25
    #179079

    I was just hesitant to look and/or purchase the older style one, not knowing if it would correct the problem. But it seems in this case , the old tech beats out the newer stuff. Thanks for helping ,and all the guidance . I`ll be on the lookout for that part .

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