’57 Fastwin mystery – please help

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    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 3049
    Topics: 42
    #202412

    you arent storing your motor with the power head lower than than the gear case.Cds are really prone to seizing if stored this way.

    Good point!

    andy
    andy

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 12
    Topics: 5
    #202634

    john, thank you for the knowledge but no, I store my motors upright just like they sit on the boat. You’ve heard of the acid test? I forgot what that phrase means exactly but I tested muriatic acid (pool strength, 29%) as I described in an earlier post. I chose the bolt I thought would be the hardest to get out, the lower rear. I first cleaned the area with a wire bush, brake clean and compressed air. I applied the acid with a regular cotton swab just enough to soak the base of the bolt head and not drip. If it did drip I wiped the excess off with a rag. I let it sit around 10 minutes or until the bubbles stopped. Then I washed the area with brake clean and blew it dry with compressed air. The idea being I wanted full strength acid to soak in and not have it diluted with the spent acid. I repeated this 8 times, sometimes letting the acid soak longer. I was worried the acid could do damage but I see none. I will try a longer soak the next time. After all that, the bolt wouldn’t budge with a hand impact or my small Milwaukee 18V impact so I soaked it with penetrating oil for 3 days. The Milwaukee moved the bolt maybe a 32nd of a turn on day 3 but the hardened bit broke. I repaired the bit with a cut-off tool but it snapped off again after several 1 second trigger pulls. I think the small cordless impact is better than the hand impact at loosening a stuck bolt but the cordless is a lot more likely to break the bit. After a few more days soaking with oil and using the hand impact, the bolt came out whole. We’ll see how it goes with the rest of the bolts but so far it looks good for my theory of removing the aluminum oxide with the acid, then soaking with oil. Some heat would probably have sped things up in stage 2 but I didn’t have time as I was just spending a minute on my way out to work and a minute when I got back.

    acid

    out

    '48 Zephyr, restored '06, runs great
    '54 Fastwin, restored '09, runs great
    '57 Fastwin, unrestored, locked up in 2018

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by andyandy.
    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 2 days ago by MumblesMumbles.
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    bobw
    bobw

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 948
    Topics: 39
    #202644

    Strange – that’s the same location of the exhaust cover screw that gave me so much trouble on my QD-20 restoration. Never tried acid soak before but got all the others out with some heat. But that last one took 3 days of heating with the MAPP gas and soaking with penetrating oil before I got it out. Patience almost always wins out.

    Bob

    1954 Johnson CD-11
    1956 Johnson RD-18
    1958 Johnson QD-19
    1959 Johnson QD-20
    1957 Evinrude Fastwin 18

    "Every 20 minute job is only a broken bolt away from a 3-day project."

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    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1159
    Topics: 39
    #202657

    The 18 volt Milwaukee cordless is what I have, too. I use a Snap-on bit, though. I forget what it cost; but it’s probably in the $35 range. No cheap; but it’s the best there is. Harbor Freight may have a great guarantee but sometimes, you would just rather get the job done, rather than go back to the store over and over. (Especially, in THESE times.) I also used Mapp gas on my salty FD exhaust bolts.

    How do you like breathing muriatic acid fumes? I used some of that, to get what was left of a thrown Tecumseh snow blower engine connecting rod off a crankshaft. It works great; but, even outside with a light wind, I couldn’t believe how bad the fumes were!

    Long live American manufacturing!

    andy
    andy

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 12
    Topics: 5
    #202698

    Bill,
    Funny you should mention a snap-on bit. The other day I searched literally for hours for a high quality bit for this job and ended up buying a used Snap-on bit from ebay. It’s scheduled to arrive on Wed. As for the fumes, I’m sure they’re poisonous/toxic. When I put acid in my pool I hold my breath when I use it. For this job I poured maybe a half ounce into a small glass jar and dipped the cotton swab into the acid, then the bolt. I’m not sure why but the fumes were not noticeable. As for Harbor Freight, I never heard of them but did hear of a similar name, see the ads below.

    '48 Zephyr, restored '06, runs great
    '54 Fastwin, restored '09, runs great
    '57 Fastwin, unrestored, locked up in 2018

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    Buccaneer
    Buccaneer

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 3836
    Topics: 963
    #202704

    I’d like the cordless hammer if it’s guaranteed “not” to miss a nail!

    Prepare to be boarded!

    bobw
    bobw

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 948
    Topics: 39
    #202708

    If it does miss the nail and just bends it, you can use the 16-ton hydraulic nail unbender!

    Bob

    1954 Johnson CD-11
    1956 Johnson RD-18
    1958 Johnson QD-19
    1959 Johnson QD-20
    1957 Evinrude Fastwin 18

    "Every 20 minute job is only a broken bolt away from a 3-day project."

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    billw

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1159
    Topics: 39
    #202711

    Mine’s like this but has a chrome base, not that it matters.

    https://shop.snapon.com/product/Flat-Tip(3-8%22)/3-8%22-Drive-3%2F8%22-Flat-Tip-Short-Industrial-Socket-Driver/GF62E

    Long live American manufacturing!

    andy
    andy

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 12
    Topics: 5
    #203814

    I tried the longer soak idea followed by heat but that failed. Also, evidently my little Milwaukee cordless impact is a bit too strong for this job. I thought it was loosening the bolt but it was twisting it and it snapped the head off.

    '48 Zephyr, restored '06, runs great
    '54 Fastwin, restored '09, runs great
    '57 Fastwin, unrestored, locked up in 2018

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    dave-bernard

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1081
    Topics: 14
    #203820

    Some times it is better to drill just the head off. then take the cover off . you still have a stud to work with. some weld a nut on the stud and the heat from the weld loosens it up.

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    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 3049
    Topics: 42
    #203821

    I agree…Oftentimes it is that shank of the screw that is corroded in place, not the actual threads. Needless to say, there is no guaranteed method, but removing the screw head should be considered after a few attempts with heat and the screwdriver….

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    dave-bernard

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1081
    Topics: 14
    #203822

    It also allows the penetrating oil to get to the threads.

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