60° looper starter stops cranking

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This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  fleetwin 1 week ago.

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  • johnyrude200
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 744
    Topics: 168
    #166582

    I have a 60° looper, 1997. Once the motor reaches a few cranks the starter disengages. It will keep spinning, but it sounds as if the bendix gear is just spinning.

    I have observed this before in a few motors; what is the cause of this?

    It will crank the motor up to 150 PSI then drop down and just spin. Is it simply a situation where the bendix stud needs some oil? This is one of those motors that has a reduction gear working with the starter, too.


    frankr
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 3904
    Topics: 43
    #166599

    Is this happening while checking compression? The “kick” when it comes off the compression stroke may casing it to disengage. Try it with the plugs in and see if it is ok with a more balanced load on the starter.

    You are right, once the bendix disengages, it will stay disengaged till you turn it off and start cranking again. That’s just the way it works (inertia).


    johnyrude200
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 744
    Topics: 168
    #166622

    Yes Frank, it happens when I test compression with all plugs out except for the cylinder I have the testing gauge plugged into. With all plugs out, this does not happen. I’ll give it a try with all plugs in too and report back.

    The odd thing is I ran a compression test in this manner and it worked fine. I pulled the motor apart to replace a single rod/piston/rings, and then this issue arose.

    I have seen this happen with other motors before when trying to start them, and they were all the same 60° looper design. Perhaps just a coincidence…


    MATTHEW B. PIEKLIK
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4
    Topics: 4
    #166643

    I had this problem also with my 1997 90 HP Evinrude E90 ELEUA. Turn the key, It sounds like it fires ,pops the bendix out and the starter spins. I went round and round with it then I remembered. When I bought it Brand new out of the box, I had a similar problem. The Marina replaced the power pack. So when this problem came up again in 2017, I put a new CDI power pack. Problem solved.


    fleetwin
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2487
    Topics: 29
    #166657

    Well, the bendix will surely kick out if there is some sort of ignition/timing issue….But, you are doing a compression test, so I am assuming there is no power to any of the plugs, correct?
    Try doing the compression test with the other three plugs installed….


    johnyrude200
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 744
    Topics: 168
    #166727

    Fleetwin – This started happening after I replaced one of the pistons/rods and put everything back together. I had all 4 coil leads grounded via some spark testers.

    For what it’s worth how would not having them grounded cause the bendix to disengage?

    I have not worked on many of these optical ignition motors, but was careful to take off/replace everything without disturbing components. In fact, I realized the components are relatively simple so was encouraged to see this.

    The motor is back outside fogged and covered in our recent snow so I may not be able to retest again until the summer. Sounds like another learning opportunity.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by  johnyrude200.

    billw
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 985
    Topics: 33
    #166735

    Some here might wonder why we’re discussing a looper in an antique forum. Many considered the loopers to be one of the final nails in OMC’s coffin; so they do have some historical significance.


    fleetwin
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2487
    Topics: 29
    #166786

    Sorry, guess I was not very clear….
    With all the coil primaries grounded and plug leads removed, there is no way any ignition issue could cause the bendix to kick out….But, you should have all the plugs installed while cranking/compression test to keep the bendix from kicking out due to uneven compression…


    fleetwin
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2487
    Topics: 29
    #166787

    The early 90 degree loopers were often referred to as “bloopers”. But, these engines got to be pretty nice after the 93 block improvements and the addition of adjustable low speed fuel needles a few years later.
    The 60 degree loopers were amazing engines that were under rated in their first production year. The ignition system is pretty strange, and prone to RFI interference, especially if the wrong plugs were used. Early 60 degree V6s had some block casting flaws that caused water to leak into the number one cylinder, I would say that most of the affected powerheads were replaced either for free or a greatly reduced price. The early 60 degree V4s had some base gasket/megaphone issues that caused water leakage into the lower cylinders….But, like the V6s, most of the affected powerheads/megaphones were replaced.
    A big nail in the OMC coffin occured when we foolishly bought up all those boat companies. Limiting the OMC boat companies to OMC engines/outdrives restricted their sales. OMC lost control of their engines letting the boat companies stock pile (wreck them) in their warehouses. Poor rigging, use on non OEM wiring/controls/cables/props made us look like complete idiots also. All this boat packaging crap killed the dealer network as well.
    I guess that the premature introduction of the ficht engines was the final nail in the coffin, many owners and dealers were left “holding the bag” when BRP took over and only honored warranties on 2000 and newer engines. But, I surely can’t blame BRP for not wanting to take on the liabilities for those early engines.


    johnyrude200
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 744
    Topics: 168
    #166794

    Great information, thank you Don.

    Dealing with more of the V4/V6 motors now so still getting familiar with the different production run varieties.

    I will say the 60 degree powerheads are slick in that you dont need to remove from the exhaust housing to do internal work (i.e. manifold is not in front of the crankcase).


    fleetwin
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2487
    Topics: 29
    #166824

    Great information, thank you Don.

    Dealing with more of the V4/V6 motors now so still getting familiar with the different production run varieties.

    I will say the 60 degree powerheads are slick in that you dont need to remove from the exhaust housing to do internal work (i.e. manifold is not in front of the crankcase).

    Well, I guess it is possible to do internal work on these engines without removing the powerhead, but I don’t recommend it…

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