Battery Question

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    Boogie


    Replies: 1
    Topics: 1
    #179039

    I have a 1989 Evenrude model 60TTL. I recently took it in for service and was told that my power pack for the number 1 cylinder was blown along with a diode and the it was due to using a maintenance free battery rather than a wet cell. Why would it make any difference? Thanks in advance.

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    crosbyman

    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 1292
    Topics: 175
    #179042

    I heard they can run up a higher voltage……. but would not be surprised if thousands were in use with no issue.

    do some searches on the web on the subject I use a size 27 costco kirland start/deep cycle on my 75 ETEC no issue

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 4 weeks ago by Avatarcrosbyman.
    Tubs
    Tubs

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2495
    Topics: 149
    #179047

    Search 1989 Johnson 60hp, overcharging battery.
    We still have a POOF issue when trying to post a link.

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    jeff-register

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 1137
    Topics: 47
    #179123

    I agree with Tubs!! The battery does not regulate voltage. Ever put a meter on the battery while running to check A.C. generator output.

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    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2810
    Topics: 36
    #179142

    Well, a faulty powerpack is not related to battery voltage or the charging system/battery….
    And, it looks like this engine uses the simple charging system with the simple rectifier….I really don’t think the sealed battery caused a failed rectifier diode either. Diodes usually fail when the battery is accidentally connected backwards (even for just a second), or there is a loose connection….
    The problem with the sealed battery is that the charging system is unregulated, so it will keep charging whether the battery needs it or not….This usually results in battery acid steaming out of the battery which is no problem on a conventional battery, simply refill the cells. You can’t add water to a sealed battery. On the other hand, the output is only 6amps, so overcharging seems unlikely unless you have no other accessories running off the battery.
    If you choose to keep using the sealed battery, it might be a good idea to hook up a temporary voltmeter to the battery, just to see if it is being “overcharged”…..A defective battery can get overcharged, whether sealed or refillable, I have seen them explode also, even on the 6 amp system….

    Tubs
    Tubs

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2495
    Topics: 149
    #179149

    I just offered the link. Seemed to explain why a dry cell battery
    could be an issue. I find it hard to believe as well but don’t have
    an opinion one way or the other.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by TubsTubs.
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    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2810
    Topics: 36
    #179155

    I read the posts also, doesn’t really make sense that a larger capacity battery would get overcharged sooner than a smaller battery…But, who knows, electricity does many things that don’t make sense to us mortals. In any event, overcharging can occur on these engines if there is no other load on the engine. I have forgotten just what the simple rectifier with the extra purple lead is for, but am guessing it has something to do with the foolish cost savings of not having the dedicated purple B+ lead in the engine harness. In any event, substituting the simple three wire rectifier in this situation will cause an issue. I will have to look up the wiring diagram for this engine to remember just what the purple rectifier lead does, I used to know….
    Nonetheless, a simple voltmeter hooked directly to your battery will let you know if it is overcharging. The simplest way to deal with this is to turn on a simple accessory (lights) while running at high speeds, but I guess it would be easy to forget to shut them off creating the opposite condition….This engine does have power trim/tilt, so making trim adjustments while underway should accomplish the same thing.
    If high voltage still haunts you, then I would replace the battery with a conventional wet battery, perhaps the next size up from what the basic recommendation is….I have a real hard time buying into the article Tubs pointed out claiming larger batteries got overcharged quicker than smaller capacity batteries, perhaps the author was referring to the sealed battery set ups….
    PS- Tubs, I know you just pointed out the article, these are not necessarily your view points…

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    fleetwin

    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2810
    Topics: 36
    #179157

    PS The four wire rectifier is still available:
    http://www.marineengine.com/parts/johnson-evinrude-parts.php?year=1989&hp=60&model=E60ELCEA&manufacturer=Evinrude&section=Ignition+System+60ttl

    I would not attempt to rig up some sort of regulator system….Later models of this engine did use a regulator, but it is air cooled and expensive….And, this engine does not have the dedicated purple B+ lead to power the regulator…I’m not sure that the earlier ignition bracket/panel on the 89 models had mounting threads for the regulator as well.

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    Boogie


    Replies: 1
    Topics: 1
    #179158

    I know that I said thanks in my initial post, but thanks! You have really answered my questions. This is a great site!

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