Evinrude Speedifour electric start

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    Paul Munson

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 9
    Topics: 4
    #203450

    I just picked up my first project of the year and need a little help on understanding this thing. It is a Evinrude Speedifour, 1939 or so model 7033. When I popped the top off the starter it looks like it has either some sprayfoam or crazy fungus growing on it. I cannot find much on this starter so any help understanding how it works and comes off would be great.. Is this something that should or shouldn’t be there. The motor for the most part looks to be in good shape but I cannot tell if the pistons are locked up until I am sure about removing the starter. The only other issue at this point is the driveshaft was lost when the previous owner took the lower unit off which leads me to believe that was the issue when it was shelved. I have a parts manual that I will be going through but I am sure I am going to have a few questions there as well once I start digging into it.

    Thanks,
    Paul

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    pm-t2

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 403
    Topics: 8
    #203604

    The fungus or whatever it is should not be there. It should be clean under that cover. That stuff may have been intended to act as insulation, but I’d suggest getting it out of there because it may be hiding problems, and could conceivably cause a short-circuit or even a fire. it looks like they may have jury-rigged some kind of voltage regulator in there. You don’t want that, its best to render the charging circuit inoperable for these motors in order to avoid the risk of overheating the windings on the rotor.

    Your motor has what some refer to as the “veranda” style starter due to the large additional section bolted onto the front side of the round starter housing. I prefer to call it the “dashboard” type.

    You basically have the same starter-generator as I’m showing on an Elto Super C, but they added that section on the front to house the key switch, power on-off switch, and ammeter.

    The Owen-Dyneto starter-generator works thusly;
    a) at low speeds, and the engine not running, it will act like a motor, and use battery power to rotate the crankshaft until such time as the engine starts
    b) at higher speeds, it acts as a generator, and supplies current to recharge the battery and run on-board accessories that use 12V DC current to operate (such as lights, pump, etc)

    To operate, the power switch is turned to the ON position, and the lever that is underneath the dashboard is pushed all the way to the right (port side of the boat) to activate the starter. Once the engine is running, the lever is returned to its normal position. All functions of the motor now are controlled by the switch.

    HOW IT COMES OFF – well, take the points cam off first. You then would have to remove the point plate. With that out of the way, next remove the cover that holds all the brushes and contacts. With that remove, the rotor is now exposed. Remove the crankshaft nut and use a puller to lift the rotor off of the crank. With the rotor out of the way, you can unbolt the circular outer housing from the top of the crankcase. Reverse procedure for assembly. Hope it helps.

    Best,
    PM T2

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    Paul Munson

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 9
    Topics: 4
    #203669

    Thanks PM T2. That info helped a bunch. I was able to clear away some of that spray foam. The more I looked at it to understand what the previous owner did along with the information you gave me it does look like they put a regulator in and tried to secure it in place with spray foam. I was also able to get it removed as well as found out the motor is not seized which was a relief. It is a bit grimey inside around the field coils. Do you have any suggestion for cleaning these or is that not a good idea. All in all it looks pretty good other than the brushes are getting short on life left.

    Thanks,
    Paul

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    pm-t2

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 403
    Topics: 8
    #203677

    You can wash things out to get rid of any accumulated grime. I would recommend it, if for no other reason than it will be easier to verify if you have deteriorated wiring or not.

    On parts where paint removal isn’t a concern (i.e. electrical components), I use a toothbrush and lacquer thinner. It cleans crud off well, and doesn’t harm the fit or function. On painted parts, don’t use anything stronger than WD-40 (and toothbrush scrub) as your solvent. Considering the mess that’s in there now, it would be well worth your while to completely take things apart. I recommend getting the regulator and attached wiring out of there and doing away with using the charging circuit altogether.

    I would bet that the reason that external regulator was added was because the original regulator failed. The voltage regulator on the Owen-Dyneto used a set of contact points that had a habit of sticking together. This could cause two problems – one, the battery could get over-charged and boil off the electrolyte, and two, the charging system would overheat the rotating element. In many instances, this caused the soldered wires to overheat and come loose – usually at about 2500 RPM or higher. The ensuing rats-nest of copper wiring was no fun to deal with, as you can imagine. It is common to find motors bearing model numbers that indicate they should be an electric start, but are equipped with a conventional flywheel magneto. Those are cases where the Owen-Dyneto appliance failed and was replaced with the less complex (and costly) flywheel magneto ignition.

    I have several outboards with the Owen-Dyneto starter-generator on them. So far, so good, I have not had any electrical issues arise. I think the key with helping those units survive is to not ask them to do too much. DIsabling the charging circuit is what I can do to help ensure that happens.

    Hope this helps.

    Best,
    PM T2

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    Paul Munson

    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 9
    Topics: 4
    #203722

    You were exactly right about the failure of the points. As I get more into the electrical schematic I looked at the area where the points are and it is completely missing the arm of the points that makes contact. Either it fell apart or the previous owner took it off. I am thinking it would be best to remove that 3rd brush and points completely from the unit at this point as I clean it up and get it functioning again.

    Thanks,
    Paul

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    pm-t2

    Canada Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 403
    Topics: 8
    #203812

    I agree with removing those parts from the equation. Be sure to properly isolate the lead(s) that get disconnected.

    PM T2

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