OMC vs HF flywheel puller

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This topic contains 87 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by Avatar johnyrude200 2 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 88 total)
  • Avatar
    wetwillie

    Replies: 91
    Topics: 15
    #41210

    My puller arrived this afternoon. That’s one serious puller! However, as much as I hate to admit it, I used it wrong. I positioned it with the flat side down vs up. Man, was that ever a mistake! I wound up bending one of the shouldered bolts that came with it because the bolt head was resting against the domed side. When I realized what I’d done, I positioned the puller properly and tried it again. I used the same bolts over again (my 2nd major mistake) because the bend was so slight. As you can imagine, I’m glad I was looking away when the bolt snapped at the shoulder. It took awhile but I was able to get the threaded section out of the flywheel. Thank you God!
    Next, I bought another set of bolts (Grade 8) and tried it again. I had a 2′ extension on both the breaker bar and the bar that goes into the side of the puller. All was going well until one of the new bolts snapped. I thanked God again that I was able to remove the piece that was still threaded into the flywheel.
    Unless someone has a suggestion, I thought I’d try it again with another set of new bolts of a higher grade. To increase my chance of success, I thought I’d try cooling off the end of the crankshaft with a can of compressed gas turned upside down after heating the flywheel up with a Bernzomatic torch.
    I look forward to any other ideas if someone has one.

    Avatar
    chris-p
    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2444
    Topics: 157
    #41212

    How exactly are you doing it? How deep are you threading them in? I am by no means trying to belittle you, but perhaps doing something wrong. Are you threading the bolts in 7/16" deep? Ensuring the puller is perfectly level, before cranking on the center bolt?

    Avatar
    wedgie
    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 963
    Topics: 94
    #41213

    That sucks. I don’t know if those shoulder bolts are available separately from OMC, or are available elsewhere like http://www.mcmaster.com/# or Fastenal

    The bolts must pull straight up and evenly, and the top of the puller be perfectly parallel to the top of the flywheel . I would get 3 new 2 1/2 grade 8 bolts , make a mark at 7/16 ths and wind them in to the flywheel to that depth and no more. Make sure to use the correct washers too.

    If you read back in this thread, you’ll see you are not the only one to have done the upside down thing. 😥

    Avatar
    wedgie
    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 963
    Topics: 94
    #41214

    I think this is the one 😉 Better double check before you order 😕
    http://www.mcmaster.com/#91259a591/=13i03ic

    this one is alloy steel. let me look some more

    frankr
    frankr
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 3939
    Topics: 43
    #41215

    Maybe this has already been said, but saying it again.

    1. Use the shoulder bolts or thread Grade-8 bolts in 7/16"
    2. Tighten the puller as much as you dare without snapping the bolts.
    3. If it hasn’t popped off yet, RAISE the flywheel with a pry such as a large screwdriver (I didn’t say a 4′ crowbar)
    4. Strike the puller center bolt with a hammer. In necessary repeat 2, 3, and 4.

    Bashing the snot out of it with a sledgehammer is not the way to strike it. It is the sharp whack that does it, not the mortal bash. And if you don’t hold the flywheel up (#3) the crankshaft has nowhere to go, so your hammer strike does no good.

    Ignorance is simply a lack of education. Ignorance can be cured. There is no cure for Stupid.

    Avatar
    vintin
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 553
    Topics: 16
    #41216

    WetWilly,

    Please loosen the flywheel nut first! 😆

    I know you did.

    Avatar
    wedgie
    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 963
    Topics: 94
    #41217

    This one ?

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#91259a587/=13i062g

    Avatar
    wetwillie

    Replies: 91
    Topics: 15
    #41218

    LOL. Good idea, Dan, but the flywheel nut is loose enough to see daylight under it.

    Avatar
    vintin
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 553
    Topics: 16
    #41219

    Just teasing you Al.

    These guys are the best help you could hope for so hang in there, you’ll get that wheel off yet.

    We missed you on Norris Lake Tuesday and Wednesday. Had some good cruising.

    Avatar
    wetwillie

    Replies: 91
    Topics: 15
    #41221

    I figured as much. Sorry I wasn’t able to join you guys.

    Now about all the responses to my update posted at 8:25. I really appreciate the number of responses and the helpful comments. I don’t feel belittled, Chris, but I appreciate you asking. 😉 Like an idiot? Yes. But that’s by my own doing and not from any of the responses.

    I threaded the original bolts in, Wedgie, until the threads were no longer visible. Less than an inch would be my guesstimate. The puller was level and parallel, to the best of my ability, every time. I used an extra washer w/smaller ID under each washer to increase the surface area contacting the bolt head.

    My 2nd mistake of the day was threading the replacement bolts in further than 7/16". Probably an inch total. FWIW, there was little to no resistance as I threaded them in. I doubt I damaged anything under the flywheel but won’t do it again. 7/16" from now on. 😉

    Frank, I’ll get another set of Grade 8 bolts in the morning, thread them in 7/16", tighten the pulley bolt as far as I feel comfy with and, per your suggestion, give it a whack with a hammer. What do I pry the underside of the flywheel up against while I hit it?

    THANKS to every one of you that has responded!

    Steve A W
    Steve A W
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 651
    Topics: 42
    #41224

    Just a little quick tip.
    On my puller bolts I put electrical shrink tube on them
    so there is only 7/16 inch of threads showing.
    Can’t run them in too far with this.

    Steve A W


    Attachments:

    Member of the MOB chapter.
    I live in Northwest Indiana

    frankr
    frankr
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 3939
    Topics: 43
    #41230
    quote WetWillie:

    I figured as much. Sorry I wasn’t able to join you guys.

    Now about all the responses to my update posted at 8:25. I really appreciate the number of responses and the helpful comments. I don’t feel belittled, Chris, but I appreciate you asking. 😉 Like an idiot? Yes. But that’s by my own doing and not from any of the responses.

    I threaded the original bolts in, Wedgie, until the threads were no longer visible. Less than an inch would be my guesstimate. The puller was level and parallel, to the best of my ability, every time. I used an extra washer w/smaller ID under each washer to increase the surface area contacting the bolt head.

    My 2nd mistake of the day was threading the replacement bolts in further than 7/16″. Probably an inch total. FWIW, there was little to no resistance as I threaded them in. I doubt I damaged anything under the flywheel but won’t do it again. 7/16″ from now on. 😉

    Frank, I’ll get another set of Grade 8 bolts in the morning, thread them in 7/16″, tighten the pulley bolt as far as I feel comfy with and, per your suggestion, give it a whack with a hammer. What do I pry the underside of the flywheel up against while I hit it?

    THANKS to every one of you that has responded!

    Consider the anatomy of the thing. The crankshaft is able to move up and down a bit in its bearings. That is by design. When you strike the puller bolt you are attempting to knock the shaft downward out of the flywheel. If the shaft is resting downward by gravity, it has nowhere to go when you strike it, so the attempt is in vain. What you are doing is raise the whole kaboodle upward so the shaft has somewhere to go (and out of the flywheel). It makes no difference how you raise it. A pry with a big screwdriver is most convenient with most people. Use whatever solid and sturdy fulcrum point is handy to pry against.

    Ignorance is simply a lack of education. Ignorance can be cured. There is no cure for Stupid.

    Avatar
    wetwillie

    Replies: 91
    Topics: 15
    #41234

    Understood, both principle and procedure. I thought you might have a suggestion as to what to pry against when I’m lifting up on the flywheel.
    This morning, I bought another set of bolts, used Steve’s idea of marking the length with shrink tubing (excellent & thanks) threaded them in and applied some serious force to the center bolt.
    I took your suggestion, Frank, one step further and put a ratcheting tie down strap under the flywheel and over a rafter located directly above. I then tightened up the strap until the motor began to lift the stern up. 🙂 I then heated the area surrounding the crank/flywheel interface until it was hot to the touch. I gave the puller bolt a couple of good solid whacks. Incredible that nothing happened. 🙁
    The flywheel remains under tension from the puller and suspended from the overhead rafter. Un-friggin-believable!

    frankr
    frankr
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 3939
    Topics: 43
    #41235

    Hmmmmmm, I guess one could say that flywheel is ON there.

    Ignorance is simply a lack of education. Ignorance can be cured. There is no cure for Stupid.

    Avatar
    wedgie
    Canada Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 963
    Topics: 94
    #41236
    quote Steve A W:

    Just a little quick tip.
    On my puller bolts I put electrical shrink tube on them
    so there is only 7/16 inch of threads showing.
    Can’t run them in too far with this.

    Steve A W

    Excellent idea Steve. I had used masking tape in the past, but heat shrink is a way better idea :ugeek:

    Willie, It may be that (as Frank has experienced) someone has used loctite on the taper 👿 Do you have an impact driver? Sometimes the rattling of the impact helps break things free.

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