Removing Viking 3.5 Flywheel

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Avatar jamesdavisiii 4 weeks, 1 day ago.

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    jamesdavisiii
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 10
    Topics: 4
    #177405

    Got a old Viking air cooled 3.5 hp. no spark, went to remove fly wheel and puller holes are not threaded, not very deep either. some kind of special puller? thinking about tapping the three holes, flywheel is tight so no way to grab with jaw puller.

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    amuller
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 845
    Topics: 134
    #177408

    I don’t know anything about Viking motors, but on Wico flywheels used on West Bend, Chrysler, etc I have found that unthreaded holes in the flywheel are common. I suppose people loosened the nut and whacked it.

    I have always threaded the holes and used a puller. You may need a “bottoming” tap to get full depth of threads if he hole is shallow.

    frankr
    frankr
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4244
    Topics: 43
    #177413

    Use a knocker. You can buy one, or you can make your own for pennies. You need two nuts, same size as flywheel nut, plus a short bolt, same thread, and as short as possible. Screw one nut up on bolt, then second one on only a turn or two. Now run the first nut down against the second and jam them together. You just made yourself a special tool.

    To use, screw the tool onto the shaft hand tight, pry upwardly moderately on the flywheel with a screwdriver, and give the knocker a whack on the end with a hammer. Put the sledge hammer away!!!! A 12 oz hammer is ideal. 16 oz at very most. It is the shock that does the job, not the bash.

    DO NOT attempt this using only the flywheel nut!! That almost always damages the crankshaft threads. The knocker applies the shock to the end of the shaft, not to the threads.

    This also works on lawn mowers and chainsaws.

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    Tubs
    Tubs
    US Member - 1 Year
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    #177426

    • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Tubs Tubs.
    • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Tubs Tubs.
    • This reply was modified 4 weeks, 1 day ago by Tubs Tubs.
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    garry-in-tampa
    Lifetime Member
    Replies: 3072
    Topics: 30
    #177439

    See if you can find a coupling nut that thread size. They are used to join lengths of threaded rod and are about as long as four standard nuts. If the hole in the flywheel is small’ you may have to trim the diameter at the bottom. Easy if you have a lathe. When it is screwed in place, thread a bolt in against the crankshaft. Then cut it off flush and stake it in place. Paint it a bright color so you won’t lose it.

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    jamesdavisiii
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 10
    Topics: 4
    #177445

    It’s a Wico, I was surprised when I didn’t see any threads, I got a old Lauson factory tool kit with pullers, usually I can remove flywheels pretty easily.

    frankr
    frankr
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 4244
    Topics: 43
    #177452

    See if you can find a coupling nut that thread size. They are used to join lengths of threaded rod and are about as long as four standard nuts. If the hole in the flywheel is small’ you may have to trim the diameter at the bottom. Easy if you have a lathe. When it is screwed in place, thread a bolt in against the crankshaft. Then cut it off flush and stake it in place. Paint it a bright color so you won’t lose it.

    More or less what Techumseh sells as special tools. Many/most Eskas use them.

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    amuller
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 845
    Topics: 134
    #177461

    You can use a knocker or a puller in most cases. On a really stubborn wheel you might need both a tight puller and to hit it. I generally would rather use a puller as it seems better not to shock the engine, especially ones with the antique type of steel magnets that may be weakened. But not all flywheels have puller holes. Lots of engines get damaged by botched flywheel removals. In any case a key point is to protect the crank. Rarely should a 2 or 3 arm puller be used to pull on the outer rim as that will probably distort the flywheel.

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    jamesdavisiii
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 10
    Topics: 4
    #177463

    Did this, came off with two light hits, I don’t like hitting the crank, if it gave me trouble I was going to tap it and use a puller. points were closed up, easy fix. Thanks everyone.

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