substitute for OMC sealer 1000

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This topic contains 23 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Avatar fleetwin 4 days, 13 hours ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
  • RICHARD A. WHITE
    RICHARD A. WHITE
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1645
    Topics: 130
    #184671

    Ben Ditmar, Ben Breitner and Ron Baker were using this, they advised you can remove the hardened stuff and continue using…I have not opened mine yet… but the 847 is still oooozing from the dad gummed puncture…ugh

    http://www.richardsoutboardtools.com

    Tubs
    Tubs
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 2406
    Topics: 147
    #184673

    It was easy enough to get it out of the nozzle.
    Just take it off and pull it out but if it drys down
    into the valve your done. All depend on how
    long it sits. If you have the can and your not
    using it regularly you could squirt a bit out from
    time to time. I cant say how long mine sat. I was
    gone most of the summer and I opened it before
    that so it was at least 3 months. Could have been
    as long as 6.

    --

    fisherman6
    fisherman6
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1774
    Topics: 39
    #184950

    Ben Ditmar, Ben Breitner and Ron Baker were using this, they advised you can remove the hardened stuff and continue using…I have not opened mine yet… but the 847 is still oooozing from the dad gummed puncture…ugh

    THAT explains the *cough* in the same line as the “fine gentlemen” 😉😁
    I have had to open up the valve on my can before too, but it took two or three months for it to set up that far down. Usually it just hardens in the nozzle and it can be removed with a pin punch or a finish nail or something. I have used both 847 and Ultra Black for gearcases and I much prefer the forgiving nature of the Ultra Black for that application. I have used my 847 for crankcase halves too, but actually prefer Yamabond 4 for that. Nothing wrong with 847 and it works for different applications. There are newer, more specialized sealants available now that I think do a better job for specific things.
    -Ben

    OldJohnnyRude on YouTube

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    jeff-register
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 1129
    Topics: 47
    #184970

    Over 30 years ago I used regular silicone for home repairs on my 53 evinrude. Just let it cure over night in the desert. I worked great!

    Avatar
    rudefan29070
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 23
    Topics: 9
    #185282

    Well Gentlemen,
    I have resealed two Gear Cases one with 847 and one with Ultra Black. I have ran the Motor (65 Small Case 18) with the ultra black about 45 Minutes in the lake and no water in the case when I drained the oil. So far so good. One thing I did do before applying the Ultra Black is I cleaned all surfaces and screws with M.E.K to ensure the surfaces and screws were clean and oil free. Then as recommended I applied the sealer and fitted the parts just a little snug. Then came back one hour later and final torqued the case screws. I haven’t ran the Motor with the 847 yet (69 Big Case) and yes the 847 is more cumbersome to work with but not terrible. Anyway thank you for all the replies

    RICHARD A. WHITE
    RICHARD A. WHITE
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 1645
    Topics: 130
    #185284

    When I was working on my Clark Troller, I used the 847 to seal the cavitation plate/ ignition cover. Literally dropped it in the water within 2 minutes of tightening the last screw…zero water intrusion…

    http://www.richardsoutboardtools.com

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    fleetwin
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2753
    Topics: 33
    #185306

    When I was working on my Clark Troller, I used the 847 to seal the cavitation plate/ ignition cover. Literally dropped it in the water within 2 minutes of tightening the last screw…zero water intrusion…

    Like Richard says, the 847 is great/strong sealer for sure, just a royal PIA to work with and clean up. These clam shell gearcases are extremely difficult to seal properly, after all, even the most minor water leak is unacceptable. It has always baffled me why the spaghetti seal does not line up with the oring on the prop shaft seal/bushing carrier, this seems to be an engineered water leak. I always add an extra dab of 847 in this area to make up for an engineering flaw. The other engineering flaw that confounds me is that there is no oring on the screw heads (that retain the skeg to the upper g/c) to seal that potential water leak. The holes/threads for the retaining screws are inside the spaghetti seal, so any imperfection is this area will result in a water leak regardless of how well the spaghetti seal/prop shaft orings were installed/sealed.

    So, I’m staying old school, will continue to curse at the 847 while applying it, and while trying to remove it….. Sure would be nice if they made the stuff in smaller tubes with a smaller nozzle/outlet though….And again, I would never substitute any sort of silicone sealer for the 847 when assembling powerhead crankcase halves. Use either the OMC gel seal (or its Loctite equivalent), or the 847…And, on the larger powerheads where spaghetti seal is used, use only the 847. Do not use the gel seal in conjunction with the spaghetti seal…

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by Avatar fleetwin.
    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by Avatar fleetwin.
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    rudefan29070
    US Member - 1 Year
    Replies: 23
    Topics: 9
    #185346

    Fleetwin, I thought the same thing about the case halve screws. So I just put sealer under the heads of them and tried to keep any sealer off the threads. I didn’t want them to be a bear to remove if I ever had to go back in there. I did cut the spaghetti seal a little longer as the manual says and I also ordered the thicker spaghetti seal as recommended by (this old outboard, great video on the procedure btw) then I put some extra sealer on the ends.

    Avatar
    fleetwin
    US Member - 2 Years
    Replies: 2753
    Topics: 33
    #185474

    Fleetwin, I thought the same thing about the case halve screws. So I just put sealer under the heads of them and tried to keep any sealer off the threads. I didn’t want them to be a bear to remove if I ever had to go back in there. I did cut the spaghetti seal a little longer as the manual says and I also ordered the thicker spaghetti seal as recommended by (this old outboard, great video on the procedure btw) then I put some extra sealer on the ends.

    Putting sealer under the heads of the screws is surely helpful. But, I don’t recommend using any alternate spaghetti seal. Leaks through the spaghetti seal are almost non existent, unless it has been misinstalled, improperly cemented in place. The leaks do occur where the ends of the spaghetti seal butt up against the prop shaft bushing/bearing/seal carrier. An actual leak through properly installed spaghetti seal would indicate a distorted/bent skeg/housing.

    I watch the this old outboard youtube videos also, very amusing. But, his techniques should not be taken as professional advice, he doesn’t even have a gearcase pressure tester…..

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